OpenRFC.org Requests For Comments ... for the community
Welcome to OpenRFC
Home Full RFC index RFC humour Our technology
 
RFC 3713
A Description of the Camellia Encryption Algorithm.
M. Matsui, J. Nakajima, S. Moriai. April 2004.

 
[Direct link][Download PDF version][Download text version]
 

Network Working Group M. Matsui Request for Comments: 3713 J. Nakajima Category: Informational Mitsubishi Electric Corporation S. Moriai Sony Computer Entertainment Inc. April 2004 A Description of the Camellia Encryption Algorithm Status of this Memo This memo provides information for the Internet community. It does not specify an Internet standard of any kind. Distribution of this memo is unlimited. Copyright Notice Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2004). All Rights Reserved. Abstract This document describes the Camellia encryption algorithm. Camellia is a block cipher with 128-bit block size and 128-, 192-, and 256-bit keys. The algorithm description is presented together with key scheduling part and data randomizing part. 1. Introduction 1.1. Camellia Camellia was jointly developed by Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation and Mitsubishi Electric Corporation in 2000 [CamelliaSpec]. Camellia specifies the 128-bit block size and 128-, 192-, and 256-bit key sizes, the same interface as the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES). Camellia is characterized by its suitability for both software and hardware implementations as well as its high level of security. From a practical viewpoint, it is designed to enable flexibility in software and hardware implementations on 32-bit processors widely used over the Internet and many applications, 8-bit processors used in smart cards, cryptographic hardware, embedded systems, and so on [CamelliaTech]. Moreover, its key setup time is excellent, and its key agility is superior to that of AES. Matsui, et al. Informational [Page 1]
RFC 3713 Camellia Encryption Algorithm April 2004 Camellia has been scrutinized by the wide cryptographic community during several projects for evaluating crypto algorithms. In particular, Camellia was selected as a recommended cryptographic primitive by the EU NESSIE (New European Schemes for Signatures, Integrity and Encryption) project [NESSIE] and also included in the list of cryptographic techniques for Japanese e-Government systems which were selected by the Japan CRYPTREC (Cryptography Research and Evaluation Committees) [CRYPTREC]. 2. Algorithm Description Camellia can be divided into "key scheduling part" and "data randomizing part". 2.1. Terminology The following operators are used in this document to describe the algorithm. & bitwise AND operation. | bitwise OR operation. ^ bitwise exclusive-OR operation. << logical left shift operation. >> logical right shift operation. <<< left rotation operation. ~y bitwise complement of y. 0x hexadecimal representation. Note that the logical left shift operation is done with the infinite data width. The constant values of MASK8, MASK32, MASK64, and MASK128 are defined as follows. MASK8 = 0xff; MASK32 = 0xffffffff; MASK64 = 0xffffffffffffffff; MASK128 = 0xffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffff; 2.2. Key Scheduling Part In the key schedule part of Camellia, the 128-bit variables of KL and KR are defined as follows. For 128-bit keys, the 128-bit key K is used as KL and KR is 0. For 192-bit keys, the leftmost 128-bits of key K are used as KL and the concatenation of the rightmost 64-bits of K and the complement of the rightmost 64-bits of K are used as KR. For 256-bit keys, the leftmost 128-bits of key K are used as KL and the rightmost 128-bits of K are used as KR. Matsui, et al. Informational [Page 2]
RFC 3713 Camellia Encryption Algorithm April 2004 128-bit key K: KL = K; KR = 0; 192-bit key K: KL = K >> 64; KR = ((K & MASK64) << 64) | (~(K & MASK64)); 256-bit key K: KL = K >> 128; KR = K & MASK128; The 128-bit variables KA and KB are generated from KL and KR as follows. Note that KB is used only if the length of the secret key is 192 or 256 bits. D1 and D2 are 64-bit temporary variables. F- function is described in Section 2.4. D1 = (KL ^ KR) >> 64; D2 = (KL ^ KR) & MASK64; D2 = D2 ^ F(D1, Sigma1); D1 = D1 ^ F(D2, Sigma2); D1 = D1 ^ (KL >> 64); D2 = D2 ^ (KL & MASK64); D2 = D2 ^ F(D1, Sigma3); D1 = D1 ^ F(D2, Sigma4); KA = (D1 << 64) | D2; D1 = (KA ^ KR) >> 64; D2 = (KA ^ KR) & MASK64; D2 = D2 ^ F(D1, Sigma5); D1 = D1 ^ F(D2, Sigma6); KB = (D1 << 64) | D2; The 64-bit constants Sigma1, Sigma2, ..., Sigma6 are used as "keys" in the F-function. These constant values are, in hexadecimal notation, as follows. Sigma1 = 0xA09E667F3BCC908B; Sigma2 = 0xB67AE8584CAA73B2; Sigma3 = 0xC6EF372FE94F82BE; Sigma4 = 0x54FF53A5F1D36F1C; Sigma5 = 0x10E527FADE682D1D; Sigma6 = 0xB05688C2B3E6C1FD; 64-bit subkeys are generated by rotating KL, KR, KA, and KB and taking the left- or right-half of them. Matsui, et al. Informational [Page 3]
RFC 3713 Camellia Encryption Algorithm April 2004 For 128-bit keys, 64-bit subkeys kw1, ..., kw4, k1, ..., k18, ke1, ..., ke4 are generated as follows. kw1 = (KL <<< 0) >> 64; kw2 = (KL <<< 0) & MASK64; k1 = (KA <<< 0) >> 64; k2 = (KA <<< 0) & MASK64; k3 = (KL <<< 15) >> 64; k4 = (KL <<< 15) & MASK64; k5 = (KA <<< 15) >> 64; k6 = (KA <<< 15) & MASK64; ke1 = (KA <<< 30) >> 64; ke2 = (KA <<< 30) & MASK64; k7 = (KL <<< 45) >> 64; k8 = (KL <<< 45) & MASK64; k9 = (KA <<< 45) >> 64; k10 = (KL <<< 60) & MASK64; k11 = (KA <<< 60) >> 64; k12 = (KA <<< 60) & MASK64; ke3 = (KL <<< 77) >> 64; ke4 = (KL <<< 77) & MASK64; k13 = (KL <<< 94) >> 64; k14 = (KL <<< 94) & MASK64; k15 = (KA <<< 94) >> 64; k16 = (KA <<< 94) & MASK64; k17 = (KL <<< 111) >> 64; k18 = (KL <<< 111) & MASK64; kw3 = (KA <<< 111) >> 64; kw4 = (KA <<< 111) & MASK64; For 192- and 256-bit keys, 64-bit subkeys kw1, ..., kw4, k1, ..., k24, ke1, ..., ke6 are generated as follows. kw1 = (KL <<< 0) >> 64; kw2 = (KL <<< 0) & MASK64; k1 = (KB <<< 0) >> 64; k2 = (KB <<< 0) & MASK64; k3 = (KR <<< 15) >> 64; k4 = (KR <<< 15) & MASK64; k5 = (KA <<< 15) >> 64; k6 = (KA <<< 15) & MASK64; ke1 = (KR <<< 30) >> 64; ke2 = (KR <<< 30) & MASK64; k7 = (KB <<< 30) >> 64; k8 = (KB <<< 30) & MASK64; k9 = (KL <<< 45) >> 64; k10 = (KL <<< 45) & MASK64; k11 = (KA <<< 45) >> 64; Matsui, et al. Informational [Page 4]
RFC 3713 Camellia Encryption Algorithm April 2004 k12 = (KA <<< 45) & MASK64; ke3 = (KL <<< 60) >> 64; ke4 = (KL <<< 60) & MASK64; k13 = (KR <<< 60) >> 64; k14 = (KR <<< 60) & MASK64; k15 = (KB <<< 60) >> 64; k16 = (KB <<< 60) & MASK64; k17 = (KL <<< 77) >> 64; k18 = (KL <<< 77) & MASK64; ke5 = (KA <<< 77) >> 64; ke6 = (KA <<< 77) & MASK64; k19 = (KR <<< 94) >> 64; k20 = (KR <<< 94) & MASK64; k21 = (KA <<< 94) >> 64; k22 = (KA <<< 94) & MASK64; k23 = (KL <<< 111) >> 64; k24 = (KL <<< 111) & MASK64; kw3 = (KB <<< 111) >> 64; kw4 = (KB <<< 111) & MASK64; 2.3. Data Randomizing Part 2.3.1. Encryption for 128-bit keys 128-bit plaintext M is divided into the left 64-bit D1 and the right 64-bit D2. D1 = M >> 64; D2 = M & MASK64; Encryption is performed using an 18-round Feistel structure with FL- and FLINV-functions inserted every 6 rounds. F-function, FL-function, and FLINV-function are described in Section 2.4. D1 = D1 ^ kw1; // Prewhitening D2 = D2 ^ kw2; D2 = D2 ^ F(D1, k1); // Round 1 D1 = D1 ^ F(D2, k2); // Round 2 D2 = D2 ^ F(D1, k3); // Round 3 D1 = D1 ^ F(D2, k4); // Round 4 D2 = D2 ^ F(D1, k5); // Round 5 D1 = D1 ^ F(D2, k6); // Round 6 D1 = FL (D1, ke1); // FL D2 = FLINV(D2, ke2); // FLINV D2 = D2 ^ F(D1, k7); // Round 7 D1 = D1 ^ F(D2, k8); // Round 8 D2 = D2 ^ F(D1, k9); // Round 9 D1 = D1 ^ F(D2, k10); // Round 10 Matsui, et al. Informational [Page 5]
RFC 3713 Camellia Encryption Algorithm April 2004 D2 = D2 ^ F(D1, k11); // Round 11 D1 = D1 ^ F(D2, k12); // Round 12 D1 = FL (D1, ke3); // FL D2 = FLINV(D2, ke4); // FLINV D2 = D2 ^ F(D1, k13); // Round 13 D1 = D1 ^ F(D2, k14); // Round 14 D2 = D2 ^ F(D1, k15); // Round 15 D1 = D1 ^ F(D2, k16); // Round 16 D2 = D2 ^ F(D1, k17); // Round 17 D1 = D1 ^ F(D2, k18); // Round 18 D2 = D2 ^ kw3; // Postwhitening D1 = D1 ^ kw4; 128-bit ciphertext C is constructed from D1 and D2 as follows. C = (D2 << 64) | D1; 2.3.2. Encryption for 192- and 256-bit keys 128-bit plaintext M is divided into the left 64-bit D1 and the right 64-bit D2. D1 = M >> 64; D2 = M & MASK64; Encryption is performed using a 24-round Feistel structure with FL- and FLINV-functions inserted every 6 rounds. F-function, FL-function, and FLINV-function are described in Section 2.4. D1 = D1 ^ kw1; // Prewhitening D2 = D2 ^ kw2; D2 = D2 ^ F(D1, k1); // Round 1 D1 = D1 ^ F(D2, k2); // Round 2 D2 = D2 ^ F(D1, k3); // Round 3 D1 = D1 ^ F(D2, k4); // Round 4 D2 = D2 ^ F(D1, k5); // Round 5 D1 = D1 ^ F(D2, k6); // Round 6 D1 = FL (D1, ke1); // FL D2 = FLINV(D2, ke2); // FLINV D2 = D2 ^ F(D1, k7); // Round 7 D1 = D1 ^ F(D2, k8); // Round 8 D2 = D2 ^ F(D1, k9); // Round 9 D1 = D1 ^ F(D2, k10); // Round 10 D2 = D2 ^ F(D1, k11); // Round 11 D1 = D1 ^ F(D2, k12); // Round 12 D1 = FL (D1, ke3); // FL D2 = FLINV(D2, ke4); // FLINV D2 = D2 ^ F(D1, k13); // Round 13 Matsui, et al. Informational [Page 6]
RFC 3713 Camellia Encryption Algorithm April 2004 D1 = D1 ^ F(D2, k14); // Round 14 D2 = D2 ^ F(D1, k15); // Round 15 D1 = D1 ^ F(D2, k16); // Round 16 D2 = D2 ^ F(D1, k17); // Round 17 D1 = D1 ^ F(D2, k18); // Round 18 D1 = FL (D1, ke5); // FL D2 = FLINV(D2, ke6); // FLINV D2 = D2 ^ F(D1, k19); // Round 19 D1 = D1 ^ F(D2, k20); // Round 20 D2 = D2 ^ F(D1, k21); // Round 21 D1 = D1 ^ F(D2, k22); // Round 22 D2 = D2 ^ F(D1, k23); // Round 23 D1 = D1 ^ F(D2, k24); // Round 24 D2 = D2 ^ kw3; // Postwhitening D1 = D1 ^ kw4; 128-bit ciphertext C is constructed from D1 and D2 as follows. C = (D2 << 64) | D1; 2.3.3. Decryption The decryption procedure of Camellia can be done in the same way as the encryption procedure by reversing the order of the subkeys. That is to say: 128-bit key: kw1 <-> kw3 kw2 <-> kw4 k1 <-> k18 k2 <-> k17 k3 <-> k16 k4 <-> k15 k5 <-> k14 k6 <-> k13 k7 <-> k12 k8 <-> k11 k9 <-> k10 ke1 <-> ke4 ke2 <-> ke3 192- or 256-bit key: kw1 <-> kw3 kw2 <-> kw4 k1 <-> k24 k2 <-> k23 k3 <-> k22 Matsui, et al. Informational [Page 7]
RFC 3713 Camellia Encryption Algorithm April 2004 k4 <-> k21 k5 <-> k20 k6 <-> k19 k7 <-> k18 k8 <-> k17 k9 <-> k16 k10 <-> k15 k11 <-> k14 k12 <-> k13 ke1 <-> ke6 ke2 <-> ke5 ke3 <-> ke4 2.4. Components of Camellia 2.4.1. F-function F-function takes two parameters. One is 64-bit input data F_IN. The other is 64-bit subkey KE. F-function returns 64-bit data F_OUT. F(F_IN, KE) begin var x as 64-bit unsigned integer; var t1, t2, t3, t4, t5, t6, t7, t8 as 8-bit unsigned integer; var y1, y2, y3, y4, y5, y6, y7, y8 as 8-bit unsigned integer; x = F_IN ^ KE; t1 = x >> 56; t2 = (x >> 48) & MASK8; t3 = (x >> 40) & MASK8; t4 = (x >> 32) & MASK8; t5 = (x >> 24) & MASK8; t6 = (x >> 16) & MASK8; t7 = (x >> 8) & MASK8; t8 = x & MASK8; t1 = SBOX1[t1]; t2 = SBOX2[t2]; t3 = SBOX3[t3]; t4 = SBOX4[t4]; t5 = SBOX2[t5]; t6 = SBOX3[t6]; t7 = SBOX4[t7]; t8 = SBOX1[t8]; y1 = t1 ^ t3 ^ t4 ^ t6 ^ t7 ^ t8; y2 = t1 ^ t2 ^ t4 ^ t5 ^ t7 ^ t8; y3 = t1 ^ t2 ^ t3 ^ t5 ^ t6 ^ t8; y4 = t2 ^ t3 ^ t4 ^ t5 ^ t6 ^ t7; y5 = t1 ^ t2 ^ t6 ^ t7 ^ t8; y6 = t2 ^ t3 ^ t5 ^ t7 ^ t8; Matsui, et al. Informational [Page 8]
RFC 3713 Camellia Encryption Algorithm April 2004 y7 = t3 ^ t4 ^ t5 ^ t6 ^ t8; y8 = t1 ^ t4 ^ t5 ^ t6 ^ t7; F_OUT = (y1 << 56) | (y2 << 48) | (y3 << 40) | (y4 << 32) | (y5 << 24) | (y6 << 16) | (y7 << 8) | y8; return FO_OUT; end. SBOX1, SBOX2, SBOX3, and SBOX4 are lookup tables with 8-bit input/ output data. SBOX2, SBOX3, and SBOX4 are defined using SBOX1 as follows: SBOX2[x] = SBOX1[x] <<< 1; SBOX3[x] = SBOX1[x] <<< 7; SBOX4[x] = SBOX1[x <<< 1]; SBOX1 is defined by the following table. For example, SBOX1[0x3d] equals 86. SBOX1: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 a b c d e f 00: 112 130 44 236 179 39 192 229 228 133 87 53 234 12 174 65 10: 35 239 107 147 69 25 165 33 237 14 79 78 29 101 146 189 20: 134 184 175 143 124 235 31 206 62 48 220 95 94 197 11 26 30: 166 225 57 202 213 71 93 61 217 1 90 214 81 86 108 77 40: 139 13 154 102 251 204 176 45 116 18 43 32 240 177 132 153 50: 223 76 203 194 52 126 118 5 109 183 169 49 209 23 4 215 60: 20 88 58 97 222 27 17 28 50 15 156 22 83 24 242 34 70: 254 68 207 178 195 181 122 145 36 8 232 168 96 252 105 80 80: 170 208 160 125 161 137 98 151 84 91 30 149 224 255 100 210 90: 16 196 0 72 163 247 117 219 138 3 230 218 9 63 221 148 a0: 135 92 131 2 205 74 144 51 115 103 246 243 157 127 191 226 b0: 82 155 216 38 200 55 198 59 129 150 111 75 19 190 99 46 c0: 233 121 167 140 159 110 188 142 41 245 249 182 47 253 180 89 d0: 120 152 6 106 231 70 113 186 212 37 171 66 136 162 141 250 e0: 114 7 185 85 248 238 172 10 54 73 42 104 60 56 241 164 f0: 64 40 211 123 187 201 67 193 21 227 173 244 119 199 128 158 2.4.2. FL- and FLINV-functions FL-function takes two parameters. One is 64-bit input data FL_IN. The other is 64-bit subkey KE. FL-function returns 64-bit data FL_OUT. FL(FL_IN, KE) begin var x1, x2 as 32-bit unsigned integer; var k1, k2 as 32-bit unsigned integer; x1 = FL_IN >> 32; Matsui, et al. Informational [Page 9]
RFC 3713 Camellia Encryption Algorithm April 2004 x2 = FL_IN & MASK32; k1 = KE >> 32; k2 = KE & MASK32; x2 = x2 ^ ((x1 & k1) <<< 1); x1 = x1 ^ (x2 | k2); FL_OUT = (x1 << 32) | x2; end. FLINV-function is the inverse function of the FL-function. FLINV(FLINV_IN, KE) begin var y1, y2 as 32-bit unsigned integer; var k1, k2 as 32-bit unsigned integer; y1 = FLINV_IN >> 32; y2 = FLINV_IN & MASK32; k1 = KE >> 32; k2 = KE & MASK32; y1 = y1 ^ (y2 | k2); y2 = y2 ^ ((y1 & k1) <<< 1); FLINV_OUT = (y1 << 32) | y2; end. 3. Object Identifiers The Object Identifier for Camellia with 128-bit key in Cipher Block Chaining (CBC) mode is as follows: id-camellia128-cbc OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { iso(1) member-body(2) 392 200011 61 security(1) algorithm(1) symmetric-encryption-algorithm(1) camellia128-cbc(2) } The Object Identifier for Camellia with 192-bit key in Cipher Block Chaining (CBC) mode is as follows: id-camellia192-cbc OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { iso(1) member-body(2) 392 200011 61 security(1) algorithm(1) symmetric-encryption-algorithm(1) camellia192-cbc(3) } The Object Identifier for Camellia with 256-bit key in Cipher Block Chaining (CBC) mode is as follows: id-camellia256-cbc OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { iso(1) member-body(2) 392 200011 61 security(1) algorithm(1) symmetric-encryption-algorithm(1) camellia256-cbc(4) } Matsui, et al. Informational [Page 10]
RFC 3713 Camellia Encryption Algorithm April 2004 The above algorithms need Initialization Vector (IV). To determine the value of IV, the above algorithms take parameters as follows: CamelliaCBCParameter ::= CamelliaIV -- Initialization Vector CamelliaIV ::= OCTET STRING (SIZE(16)) When these object identifiers are used, plaintext is padded before encryption according to RFC2315 [RFC2315]. 4. Security Considerations The recent advances in cryptanalytic techniques are remarkable. A quantitative evaluation of security against powerful cryptanalytic techniques such as differential cryptanalysis and linear cryptanalysis is considered to be essential in designing any new block cipher. We evaluated the security of Camellia by utilizing state-of-the-art cryptanalytic techniques. We confirmed that Camellia has no differential and linear characteristics that hold with probability more than 2^(-128), which means that it is extremely unlikely that differential and linear attacks will succeed against the full 18-round Camellia. Moreover, Camellia was designed to offer security against other advanced cryptanalytic attacks including higher order differential attacks, interpolation attacks, related-key attacks, truncated differential attacks, and so on [Camellia]. 5. Informative References [CamelliaSpec] Aoki, K., Ichikawa, T., Kanda, M., Matsui, M., Moriai, S., Nakajima, J. and T. Tokita, "Specification of Camellia --- a 128-bit Block Cipher". http://info.isl.ntt.co.jp/camellia/ [CamelliaTech] Aoki, K., Ichikawa, T., Kanda, M., Matsui, M., Moriai, S., Nakajima, J. and T. Tokita, "Camellia: A 128-Bit Block Cipher Suitable for Multiple Platforms". http://info.isl.ntt.co.jp/camellia/ [Camellia] Aoki, K., Ichikawa, T., Kanda, M., Matsui, M., Moriai, S., Nakajima, J. and T. Tokita, "Camellia: A 128-Bit Block Cipher Suitable for Multiple Platforms - Design and Analysis -", In Selected Areas in Cryptography, 7th Annual International Workshop, SAC 2000, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, August 2000, Proceedings, Lecture Notes in Computer Science 2012, pp.39-56, Springer- Verlag, 2001. Matsui, et al. Informational [Page 11]
RFC 3713 Camellia Encryption Algorithm April 2004 [CRYPTREC] "CRYPTREC Advisory Committee Report FY2002", Ministry of Public Management, Home Affairs, Posts and Telecommunications, and Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, March 2003. http://www.soumu.go.jp/joho_tsusin/security/ cryptrec.html, CRYPTREC home page by Information-technology Promotion Agency, Japan (IPA) http://www.ipa.go.jp/security/enc/CRYPTREC/index- e.html [NESSIE] New European Schemes for Signatures, Integrity and Encryption (NESSIE) project. http://www.cryptonessie.org [RFC2315] Kaliski, B., "PKCS #7: Cryptographic Message Syntax Version 1.5", RFC 2315, March 1998. Matsui, et al. Informational [Page 12]
RFC 3713 Camellia Encryption Algorithm April 2004 Appendix A. Example Data of Camellia Here are test data for Camellia in hexadecimal form. 128-bit key Key : 01 23 45 67 89 ab cd ef fe dc ba 98 76 54 32 10 Plaintext : 01 23 45 67 89 ab cd ef fe dc ba 98 76 54 32 10 Ciphertext: 67 67 31 38 54 96 69 73 08 57 06 56 48 ea be 43 192-bit key Key : 01 23 45 67 89 ab cd ef fe dc ba 98 76 54 32 10 : 00 11 22 33 44 55 66 77 Plaintext : 01 23 45 67 89 ab cd ef fe dc ba 98 76 54 32 10 Ciphertext: b4 99 34 01 b3 e9 96 f8 4e e5 ce e7 d7 9b 09 b9 256-bit key Key : 01 23 45 67 89 ab cd ef fe dc ba 98 76 54 32 10 : 00 11 22 33 44 55 66 77 88 99 aa bb cc dd ee ff Plaintext : 01 23 45 67 89 ab cd ef fe dc ba 98 76 54 32 10 Ciphertext: 9a cc 23 7d ff 16 d7 6c 20 ef 7c 91 9e 3a 75 09 Matsui, et al. Informational [Page 13]
RFC 3713 Camellia Encryption Algorithm April 2004 Acknowledgements Shiho Moriai worked for NTT when this document was developed. Authors' Addresses Mitsuru Matsui Mitsubishi Electric Corporation Information Technology R&D Center 5-1-1 Ofuna, Kamakura Kanagawa 247-8501, Japan Phone: +81-467-41-2190 Fax: +81-467-41-2185 EMail: matsui@iss.isl.melco.co.jp Junko Nakajima Mitsubishi Electric Corporation Information Technology R&D Center 5-1-1 Ofuna, Kamakura Kanagawa 247-8501, Japan Phone: +81-467-41-2190 Fax: +81-467-41-2185 EMail: june15@iss.isl.melco.co.jp Shiho Moriai Sony Computer Entertainment Inc. Phone: +81-3-6438-7523 Fax: +81-3-6438-8629 EMail: shiho@rd.scei.sony.co.jp camellia@isl.ntt.co.jp (Camellia team) Matsui, et al. Informational [Page 14]
RFC 3713 Camellia Encryption Algorithm April 2004 Full Copyright Statement Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2004). This document is subject to the rights, licenses and restrictions contained in BCP 78 and except as set forth therein, the authors retain all their rights. This document and the information contained herein are provided on an "AS IS" basis and THE CONTRIBUTOR, THE ORGANIZATION HE/SHE REPRESENTS OR IS SPONSORED BY (IF ANY), THE INTERNET SOCIETY AND THE INTERNET ENGINEERING TASK FORCE DISCLAIM ALL WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO ANY WARRANTY THAT THE USE OF THE INFORMATION HEREIN WILL NOT INFRINGE ANY RIGHTS OR ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Intellectual Property The IETF takes no position regarding the validity or scope of any Intellectual Property Rights or other rights that might be claimed to pertain to the implementation or use of the technology described in this document or the extent to which any license under such rights might or might not be available; nor does it represent that it has made any independent effort to identify any such rights. Information on the procedures with respect to rights in RFC documents can be found in BCP 78 and BCP 79. Copies of IPR disclosures made to the IETF Secretariat and any assurances of licenses to be made available, or the result of an attempt made to obtain a general license or permission for the use of such proprietary rights by implementers or users of this specification can be obtained from the IETF on-line IPR repository at http://www.ietf.org/ipr. The IETF invites any interested party to bring to its attention any copyrights, patents or patent applications, or other proprietary rights that may cover technology that may be required to implement this standard. Please address the information to the IETF at ietf-ipr@ietf.org. Acknowledgement Funding for the RFC Editor function is currently provided by the Internet Society. Matsui, et al. Informational [Page 15]

   

[Home] [Full RFC index] [RFC humour] [Our technology]

Copyright © Inter-Corporate Computer & Network Services, Inc.  All rights reserved.
All trademarks and RFC contents are the property of their respective owners.